Bellamy By Brian Bonar Sticks To San Diego Tradition

Bellamy by Brian Bonar sits right in the middle of Escondido, and it is a place that Brian Bonar wants people all over San Diego to try. He believes in serving the best food from some of the best recipes in the world, but he wants to do so in a place that makes people feel like they are sitting in a place stuck in time, He is going to be able to make it easy for people to have a good time when they come downtown, and he is creating a new place out in the country that will be even nicer.

Bellamy is named just like a lot of the other places in the area, and he wants it to feel like it has been there since the city was founded. The name fits right in, and Brian Bonar serves food that most people would only find at places that require a coat and tie.

He took away the coat and tie, and he replaced it with an ambience that people find relaxing because it is a simple place to come and have a bite to eat before moving on with the rest of their day.

Mr. Bonar wants to put a really nice ranch out in the country where he is going to put his best kitchen and chef. He is setting an empire of places to eat that people will love, and he wants the ranch to be a place where people can go to events.

Being able to go to events something that makes food taste even better, and Brian could begin farming on the land if he wanted to. He is going to keep his options open, and he is going to stay true to what people value in the San Diego area.

San Diego is a quiet city that tries to remain as calm as it can. San Diego wants to maintain its image as being the biggest city in America that can still have fun, and Mr. Bonar likes the fact that it is so laid back where he lives now that people will come into his restaurant and hang out.

San Diego Magazine He has a lunch crowd that is great, and he has a dinner crowd that is just as good. Some people come to the bar, and other people come because he has the best European food anywhere.

San Diego gets better every time Mr. Bonar opens a new place. He is making downtown Escondido look great, and he is opening a ranch that will accommodate anyone. He is using his Scottish roots to build an empire in the San Diego area, but he is fitting right in. His love of the area is obvious.

U.S. Money Reserve: The True Cost of a Penny

In a CNBC Squawk Box interview with the U.S. Money Reserve president, Philip Diehl, the question at hand was not whether the U.S. penny was too expensive to continue producing, but whether or not the discontinuation of the coin would distort and perhaps even press inflation further. Diehl states that the aforementioned argument is one that has been made for the last 25 years by penny lobbyists, among whom have private interests in the production of the penny; Zinc manufacturers, since pennies are comprised of 97.5 percent Zinc, and the Illinois Congressional Delegation, for the use of Abraham Lincoln’s image, are the primary lobbyists pushing for the penny to remain in production. The fear of distortion and/or inflation persisting do due the suspension of the penny comes into question mainly in the sale of goods, where consumers feel that companies will choose to round up their prices. Diehl argues that with the state of the current market price, companies are well within their means to raise the prices of goods now. Diehl suggests that companies are more likely to round prices down to avoid “…irritating the customer for a penny” (P. Diehl, CNBC Squawk Box, December 30, 2015). With 75 percent of all transactions being in an electronic format, rounding down prices would only affect a small portion of the 25 percent cash transactions.

Would the American people really mourn the loss of the penny, when millions of them are thrown away on a daily basis? Is it worth producing a coin that pays less than minimum wage to stoop down and pick up off the street? Many hold sentimental value to the penny, but by removing the penny from production, the U.S. Reserve would save 105 million dollars, which is a small savings in capital when compared to the nickel, which costs well over five cents to create. However, Diehl states that there is a better opportunity to reconfigure the composition of the nickel to make it profitable or close to profitable. It is clear that efforts have been made to preserve the coin, but “…the penny is beyond hope…it has outlived its usefulness for over 25 years” (P. Diehl, CNBC Squawk Box, December 30, 2015).

 

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